The best MMTC day.

As part of my training, I attend the Midland Ministry Training course, and on Thursday 17th May was the most amazing day since September. We had Mike Reeves come and give us a whole day of talks on the history of the church, and especially looking at the Reformation. Mike Reeves is the head of theology of UCCF (Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship), He was a minister at All Souls Church, Langham Place in central London and spent his spare time doing a doctorate in systematic theology at King’s College. He is now responsible for overseeing all the work of Theology Network. He has written so many books on historical theology, and I am planning to buy and read these, so watch this space for any reviews.

As part of the day, he went through the start of the Reformation looking at Martin Luther, then Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Johnathan Edwards and the Puritan Richard Sibbs. He then did a contrast on “Religious affections” between Johnathan Edwards and Friedrich Schleiermacher.

The biggest lesson that I learned from the day is from John Calvin’s 4 wheel mode of study to both people and pastors. As part of Calvin’s syllabus to train pastors, he introduced the studies of doctrines. This is something we need to start teaching more in our churches. The thought that I came away was. “We preach more bible yet we don’t teach more doctrine”. We need to start to ground our bible knowledge into the doctrines of the faith, and really get to know our Lord and saviour Jesus Christ. Only then will we begin to grapple with the heresies and false teachings that are being stirred up in the mix. Let’s all get back into Reformation theology and bring out the true gospel of Jesus Christ.

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Author: Urban Curate

Following from the Ministry Trainee, I am a urban Curate who is at a church in the West Midlands with a passion to serve the Lord. I'm 28 years old, married with two children.

2 thoughts on “The best MMTC day.”

  1. Amen and amen Simon! I’ve certainly found that reading the Reformers, and further back than that the Patristic Fathers, offers a tremendous depth to the faith that is really important to sustaining it and indeed supporting it doctrinally – for Anglicanism in particular it would be very worth reading about Thomas Cranmer, as he has of course had a rather profound influence in shaping the Reformed theology of the Church of England, – his writing is overflowing with Scripture, supported by the Fathers. Fascinating stuff.

  2. Amen and amen Simon! I’ve certainly discovered that reading the Reformers, and further back the Patristic Fathers, offers a tremendous depth to the faith that is vital to sustaining it and indeed supporting it doctrinally. For Anglicanism in particular it would be very worth reading into Thomas Cranmer, as he has of course had a rather profound influence on shaping the Reformed theology of the Church of England – his writing overflows with Scripture, supported by the Fathers. Fascinating Stuff. Not to forget also that we do profess a creedal belief to a connection with all of the saints gone before through the ‘communion of saints’, so it’s worth learning what they thought …

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